Building a Dynamic Mobile CI System

18 minute read

The mobile space has changed quickly, even within the past few years. At Shopify, the world’s largest Rails application, we have seen the growth and potential of the mobile market and set a goal of becoming a mobile-first company. Today, over 130,000 merchants are using Shopify Mobile to set up and run their stores from their smartphones. Through the inherent simplicity and flexibility of the mobile platform, many mobile-focused products have found success.

Our production engineering team recently revamped our old continuous integration setup to be more dynamic and built to scale from the ground up. Previously, the environments were shared between projects, with capacity statically assigned to either Android or iOS. This made evolving the configuration difficult because it required updating all projects at the same time.

We needed a system to replace our preconfigured Mac Minis that was faster, more reliable and could scale to a larger number of builds. We set out to build something that, in terms of performance, took less than 10 minutes per build and was scalable across our entire engineering team. In this blog post we’ll share how we built the new system, how it works, and what we learned in the process.

This post was co-written with Arham Ahmed, and shout-outs to Sean Corcoran of MacStadium and Tim Lucas of Buildkite.

Sander Lijbrink

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The Side Hustle: Building a Quadcopter Controller for iOS

Our engineering blog is home to our stories sharing technical knowledge and lessons learned. But that's only part of the story: we hire passionate people who love what they do and are invested in mastering their craft. Today we launch "The Side Hustle," an occasional series highlighting some side projects from our devs while off the Shopify clock.

When Gabriel O'Flaherty-Chan noticed quadcopter controllers on mobile mostly translated analog controls to digital, he took it upon himself to find a better design.

For under $50, you can get ahold of a loud little flying piece of plastic from Amazon, and they’re a lot of fun. Some of them even come with cameras and Wi-Fi for control via a mobile app.

Unfortunately, these apps are pretty low quality — they’re unreliable and frustrating to use, and look out of place in 2017. The more I used these apps, the more frustrated I got, so I started thinking about ways I could provide a better solution, and two months later I emerged with two things:

1. An iOS app for flying quadcopters called SCARAB, and

2. An open-source project for building RC apps called QuadKit

Gabriel O'Flaherty-Chan

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